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Luckiest Photographer Ever Captures 18-Foot Great White Shark Devouring a Whale

Not exactly what you expect to see on a whale-watching tour, but still a once-in-a-lifetime experience.


Every once in a while you get to see a picture of the wild world in its natural state that is so intense it seems brutal. When photographer Joanne Jarzobski discovered a great white shark feeding on a massive whale carcass, the resulting photos caused quite the reaction.

For the most part, people were amazed to see the massive, 18-foot-long predator of the shark in its natural feeding state. Others found the footage graphic. But getting a look at how nature works is quite amazing, and these photos are no different.

Joanna Jarzobski posted the images on her photography page with the caption, "Great white recycling a Finner!" The "finner" she refers to is a fin whale, which is the second-largest species on Earth, next to the blue whale.

Given that the shark in the photos is 18 feet long, the images of the whale are particularly astounding. Both animals photographed are simply massive.

In another photo you can see the shark's gargantuan jaw and teeth taking a huge bite out of the carcass.

Many people requested video footage of the amazing encounter, but Jarzobski hasn't posted any video clips as of yet.

Sharks do no typically hunt or eat whales unless they are injured or, as in these photos, deceased. However, according to New Scientist, recently sharks have been starting to hunt and kill whales. This is not the norm, though, and nothing about this particular incident seems to suggest this was the case here.

This whale was also more than three or four times the size of the great white, which implies that the predator wouldn't have even tried to hunt it — no matter how hungry it may have been.

The footage took place in Cape Cod, off the coast of Massachusetts, which is not widely known for its shark and whale population. However, both animals are known to frequent the waters surrounding the state, and whale-watching cruises (like the one that resulted in the above photos) are available to tourists and residents alike.

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