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The Mystery of Last Week’s Alaskan Ice Monster Has Been Solved

A video was released last week showing a 12- to 15-foot-long mystery beast with an ice-covered head and a long tail swimming near Fairbanks, Alaska.


You've probably scrolled through so many Halloween costume Facebook posts and eaten so much Halloween candy by now that you're sick of anything Halloween-related.

But there's still one Halloween mystery that needs wrapping up: The Case of the Alaskan Ice Monster.

 

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In case you missed it, the Alaskan Bureau of Land Management released a video last week taken by two of its employees. It showed a 12- to 15-foot-long mystery beast with an ice-covered head and a long tail swimming in the Chena River near Fairbanks, Alaska.

“It’s a strange thing. I don’t know what I would have done if I had come by in a canoe or something,” Craig McCaa, one employee who filmed the ice monster told Alaska Dispatch News last week. “But looking from it above on the University Avenue bridge I didn’t feel too threatened.”

 

 

Even the government agency had no idea what it was looking at — and speculation in the comments section on the video was rampant.

A shark? Alligators? A beaver? Moose hide? Mutant cross-breed? Zombie salmon?

 

 

Some people claimed they saw a face, others a snout. Some saw barnacles, and others definitely spotted tentacles in the murky water below.

But experts at another agency stepped in to solve the mystery.

 

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In an update, the Bureau of Land Management gave credit to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game for identifying the ice monster as "frazil ice stuck to a rope that is probably caught on a bridge pier."

Frazil ice is loose, slushy ice that can form on running water. It stuck to the rope, causing it to float.

And that serpentine movement? Just the current of the river.

But their only real proof is this photo of an empty river after the temperature went up and the snow and ice on the river melted.

 

 

So the ice monster may just be lurking beneath the surface, waiting until next Halloween to reappear.

 

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