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Famous Baby Seals Survive 7.8-Magnitude New Zealand Earthquake

It turns out Ohau Point’s adorable colony of baby seals was hit by last month’s terrifying earthquake, but a new report shows they’re still thriving.


We've written before about the adorable colony of baby seals famous for splashing around the Ohau Point waterfall in New Zealand. It turns out the colony's waterfall was impacted by the terrifying 7.8-magnitude earthquake that rattled New Zealand last month, but a new report shows the seals are still thriving.

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Jackson Lidgard, an 18-year-old local resident, visited the colony, which is just north of Kaikoura, the town hit hardest by the earthquake, reports New Zealand news site Stuff.

Although he reported some damage to the pond and waterfall, he said it is not totally destroyed and will likely clear up once some rain washes the rubble away. He filmed some of the aftermath, and you can see the footage below:

Even better news is that, despite the damage — which includes an enormous rick in the middle of the pond — there are still seals splashing around the waterfall, according to reports from the local Department of Conservation.

"It does look like the stream is still flowing and seals will eventually find their way upstream, but the pool at the base of the waterfall is largely filled with rubble," a local operations manager, Phil Bradfield, told Stuff.

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"A lot of them have just moved north into the bigger rocks that are now exposed and are having their pups there," ranger Mike Morrissey said.

The survival of the seals is a silver lining to the scary news of the intense November earthquakes.

 

Check our article: Seal vs sea lion - Check Real Difference

 

Learn about how you can help vulnerable marine animals by signing up with Oceana.

 

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