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Would You Eat Slimehead? Due to Fish Rebranding, You Already Might Have

As popular fish become overfished, the fishing industry has taken to fish rebranding, renaming fish that in the past lacked an allure thanks to poor naming.


The difference between being loved and being loathed might all be in the name when it comes to fish.

As popular fish such as tuna and snapper become overfished, the fishing industry has taken to renaming and rebranding fish that have in the past lacked an allure thanks to poor naming.

So what type of fish are you really eating? Here are fish that have become a bit more revered all thanks to a quick rebrand.

 

The Patagonian Toothfish is now the Chilean Sea Bass

Like other uncool fish in need of a makeover, the Patagonian Toothfish was considered a bycatch for decades. It snagged the new name in the 1970s when a fish merchant stumbled across it at a Chilean seaport, according to Priceonomics. However, the new name can be misleading. It’s not bass, but a cod.—and the majority of stock are plucked from the arctic regions, not off the coast of Chile.

The Slimehead has been renamed as the more appetizing Orange Roughy. Flickr/Mark Yokoyama The Slimehead has been renamed as the more appetizing Orange Roughy. Flickr/Mark Yokoyama

 

Escolar is now White Tuna, Butterfish, Rudderfish or the Hawaiian Walu

What was once the bycatch of tuna has become a feature on the menus of trendy restaurants. Unfortunately, its title change doesn’t shift much else. Escolar is a bottom-feeder, and the human digestive system is iffy on the whole thing, with gastrointestinal issues a possible side effect of consumption, according to the website Mother Jones.

 

Slimehead is now the Orange Roughy

With a name like Slimehead there was no way this fish was going to even make it onto the restaurant menu let alone get ordered. The original name came from the fish’s most delightful feature, its mucus canals, according to the Washington Post. The new name – like the Patagonian Toothfish, the change happened in the 1970s - narrows in on the Slimehead’s bright orange scales, a more sellable features.

 

The Rockfish is now Red Snapper

A fish that has become popular for Californians in recent years is the red snapper ... except it isn’t. It’s the rockfish, the umbrella name given to a variety of fish that are caught off the west coast of the US and are sold under the name "Red Snapper". True snapper is only found in the Atlantic Ocean, according to Michael Wagner, owner of Seafood Specialties.

 

Shark is now Rock Salmon

In the UK, a traditional meal of fish and chips might really be shark and chips, according to the Daily Mail. Shark meat, often from the not-so-appetizing mud shark or spiny dogfish, has been repackaged as rock salmon to appeal to consumers.

 

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