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Meet the Brainless, Boneless, Predatory Worm That's Taller Than You

The bobbit worm looks like a centipede, stretched 10 feet and covered in rainbow glitter. So ... it’s not just terrifying; it’s flamboyantly terrifying.



Some monsters hide under the bed and some hide in the closet. But we're pretty sure the world's most terrifying, real-life monsters hide under the sand.

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Meet the sand striker, otherwise known as the bobbit worm, or Eunice aphroditois. The sand striker is basically what you would get if you mixed a centipede with holographic ravewear with hubba bubba bubblegum (the really long kind.)

That's because the sand striker looks like what would happen if someone took a centipede — an objectively gross animal to begin with — and stretched it out until it was around 10 feet long and then covered it with rainbow glitter. In other words, it's not just terrifying; it's flamboyantly terrifying.

The sand striker may look just evil on the outside, but it's also evil on the inside. That is, it hunts using very sneaky and deceptive tactics, according to Wired.

The worm buries its entire, feet-long body in the sand until just its Stranger-Things-monster-head stick out of the sand. It then uses its five antennae to detect any small fish that are unlucky enough to venture into its path. When they do, the sand striker — you guessed it — strikes from within the sand.

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Little is known about how the sand striker digests is hard-won prey, and scientists speculated to Wired that the animal may have some kind of lethal toxin that euthanizes the prey and allows it to pass, tragically, through the worm's digestive tract. The only upside to this method of killing is that the sand striker's victims are likely dead before they stare down the clamping, iridescent jaws of doom that lie ahead.

Little is known about the reproductive tendencies of the sand striker, which is probably for the best, and we would pity any scientist tasked with observing this fiendish demon from the Upside Down getting its smooch game on.

The last important thing to know about the sand striker is that it gets its name from the infamous Bobbitt family incident where Lorena Bobbitt lopped off her husband's penis, drove into a field, threw the member out to the reeds and then called 911. Medics later found and reattached the penis, and the entirety of that story, in some ways, is less terrifying than the entire existence of the bobbit worm.

Check our article: Bobbit Worm Video Will Give You Nightmares

Good luck getting to sleep, and don't look under the sand if you know what's good for you.

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