Support Us
Follow Us
YouTube/Newsflare

WATCH: This Shark Is About to be Attacked by Another Giant Shark

Nature in action.


Sharks are at the top of the food chain, but that doesn't mean they don't face their own predators. Sometimes sharks go after one of their own, like the tiger shark who bit down on a bull shark in Florida.

(Warning: The below content may be considered disturbing, but it's also just nature.)

According to Newsflare, a group of fishermen in Miami were looking to hook tarpon when a bull shark grabbed the line instead.

Then, from out of nowhere, a tiger shark came up from behind and grabbed the bull shark by the tail.

Giphy/Newsflare

The much bigger shark bit the whole tail section off.

Giphy/Newsflare

The doomed bull shark tried to swim away, but its trail of blood had another shark hot on its heels.

Giphy/Newsflare

According to NatGeo, it's actually not unusual for tiger sharks to go after hooked sharks.

Shark scientist George Burgess told NatGeo that tiger sharks are pros "at taking advantage of situations when a potential prey item is compromised ... and nothing makes an animal more compromised than having a hook in its mouth and being pulled to a boat."

Plus, fishing is a pretty noisy activity. NatGeo said that once a fish (or shark) is hooked and splashing around, it can signal larger predators to come check out the scene.

That's why you hear of so many stories of sharks eating sharks that were already on a fishing line.

Like this hammerhead who became the target of another tiger shark.

Giphy/NatGeo

Sharks can also attack their fellow sharks over territory disputes.

"Sharks have their own territories," a COEX Aquarium staff member told Reuters after one of their own sharks had eaten its tankmate. "Sometimes, when they bump into each other, they bite out of astonishment."

But turf wars seem to elicit more of a quick warning bite than a sorry-you-have-no-tail-now bite.

Like these two great whites battling around a diving cage.

Giphy/oceanskeepers

And while Azula reported that sharks can sometimes eat their fellow embryos in the womb (to cut down on competition over nutrients while they're growing), it's a pretty rare sight to see fully grown sharks go after each other.

So check out the crazy video below to see the tiger shark/bull shark fight in action. (Warning: There's some NSFW profanity in it.)

Show Comments ()

Literally Just 50+ Photos of Stunningly Beautiful Sea Slugs

Did you know nudibranchs (aka sea slugs) are basically the Beyoncés of the ocean? Check out these beautiful sea slugs that, you know, woke up like this.

Keep Reading Show less

Sign Up For Our Newsletter Subscribe Shark


Sign Up For Our Newsletter Subscribe Shark